Putting Limits on Standardized Testing

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Putting Limits on Standardized Testing

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Alex Vaughn, Writer

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Are you sick of standardized tests? Well, you are not alone. Students and parents everywhere are pushing back about the overwhelming number of tests and have gotten the attention of the president.

The Obama administration declared in late October that the push on standardized testing has gone too far and has urged schools to lessen the significance placed on standardized testing and instead make exams more purposeful. The administration called for a limit that proposes that no child would spend more than two percent of classroom time taking tests. This plan is to reduce the amount of over-testing that has been placed on students.

Though the president agrees with reducing the amount of testing, he does not want to rid of it completely.

President Obama says: “Today, as a parent, I want to know how my child is doing in school, and I want my teacher to know that, too. As president, I want to hold all of us accountable for making sure every child, everywhere, is learning what he or she needs to be successful. That’s why I believe that in moderation, smart, strategic tests can help us measure our kids’ progress in school and can help them learn.

Betsy Thomas, 9th and 10th grade Lipscomb Academy Counselor suggests that, “Having less standardized tests in schools has the potential to benefit both teachers and students. Students will be relieved of the stress and pressure that these tests produce, and teachers will be more freely to teach concepts and skills students need for life instead of information they need for a test.”

Senior Emily Wieman says that, “Standardized testing should be required, but it should not be enforced as much as it is now. Tests should not determine the whole outcome of your college and career like it does now because it is not an accurate reflection of someone’s personality or intelligence.”

The White House hopes Congress will consider testing this idea as legislators work to rewrite the law, but without legislation behind this new policy it’s not confirmed how or if this plan will work.

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